Online dating psychology research journal

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and to become vengeful in response to partner aggression when they feel insecure in the relationship," the authors write.Online dating sites are not "scientific." Despite claims of using a "science-based" approach with sophisticated algorithm-based matching, the authors found "no published, peer-reviewed papers -- or Internet postings, for that matter -- that explained in sufficient detail …"In the words of one online dater: 'Where else can you go in a matter of 20 minutes [and] look at 200 women who are single and want to go on dates?' " Along with Reis, other co-authors include Eli Finkel, associate professor of social psychology at Northwestern University and lead author on the paper; Paul Eastwick, assistant professor of psychology at Texas A&M University; Benjamin Karney, professor of psychology at the University of California at Los Angeles; and Susan Sprecher, professor of sociology and psychology at Illinois State University.• Men were approximately 40 percent more likely to initiate contact with a woman after viewing her profile than women were after viewing a man's profile (12.5 to 9 percent). The authors caution that matching sites' emphasis on finding a perfect match, or soulmate, may encourage an unrealistic and destructive approach to relationships."People with strong beliefs in romantic destiny (sometimes called soulmate beliefs) -- that a relationship between two people either is or is not 'meant to be' -- are especially likely to exit a romantic relationship when problems arise …Having no choices can lead to misery, but too many options can overwhelm and lead you to worry that you’ve chosen wrong.You can feel confident in your decision about which car to buy when there are only three under consideration, but if there are hundreds, you’ll constantly second-guess yourself and wonder if you could have done better.

According to research by Michael Rosenfeld from Stanford University and Reuben Thomas from City College of New York, in the early 1990s, less than 1 percent of the population met partners through printed personal advertisements or other commercial intermediaries.

And corresponding by computer for weeks or months before meeting face-to-face has been shown to create unrealistic expectations, he says.

The 64-page analysis reviews more than 400 psychology studies and public interest surveys, painting a full and fascinating picture of an industry that, according to one industry estimate, attracted 25 million unique users around the world in April 2011 alone.

Those percentages are likely even larger today, the authors write. Through the 1980s and into the 1990s, a stigma was associated with personal advertisements that initially extended to online dating.

But today, "online dating has entered the mainstream, and it is fast shedding any lingering social stigma," the authors write. • A 2010 study of 6,485 users of a major online dating site found that men viewed three times more profiles than women did (597,169 to 196,363).

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